Henry King
An Elegy Occasioned By The Losse Of The Most Incomparable Lady Stanhope, Daughter To The Earl Of Northumberland by Henry King

An Elegy Occasioned By The Losse Of The Most Incomparable Lady Stanhope, Daughter To The Earl Of Northumberland by Henry King

Lightned by that dimme Torch our sorrow bears We sadly trace thy Coffin with our tears; And though the Ceremonious Rites are past Since thy fair body into earth was cast; Though ...

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A Penitential Hymne by Henry King

A Penitential Hymne by Henry King

Hearken O God unto a Wretches cryes Who low dejected at thy footstool lies. Let not the clamour of my heinous sin Drown my requests, which strive to enter in At those bright ...

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Sic Vita by Henry King

Sic Vita by Henry King

Like to the falling of a star, Or as the flights of eagles are, Or like the fresh spring's gaudy hue, Or silver drops of morning dew, Or like a wind that chafes the flood, Or ...

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An Acknowledgment by Henry King

An Acknowledgment by Henry King

My best of friends! what needs a chain to tie One by your merit bound a Votarie? Think you I have some plot upon my peace, I would this bondage change for a release? Since 'twas ...

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On The Earl Of Essex by Henry King

On The Earl Of Essex by Henry King

Essex twice made unhappy by a Wife, Yet Marry'd worse unto the Peoples strife: He who by two Divorces did untie His Bond of Wedlock and of Loyalty: Who was by Easiness of Nature ...

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A Renunciation by Henry King

A Renunciation by Henry King

WE, that did nothing study but the wayTo love each other, with which thoughts the dayRose with delight to us and with them set,Must learn the hateful art, how to forget.We, that ...

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Sonnet. To Patience by Henry King

Sonnet. To Patience by Henry King

Down stormy passions, down; no more Let your rude waves invade the shore Where blushing reason sits and hides Her from the fury of your tides. Fit onely 'tis where you bear sway ...

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Sonnet.  The Double Rock by Henry King

Sonnet. The Double Rock by Henry King

Since thou hast view'd some Gorgon, and art grown A solid stone: To bring again to softness thy hard heart Is past my art. Ice may relent to water in a thaw; But stone made flesh ...

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Sonnet. Dry Those Fair, Those Chrystal Eyes by Henry King

Sonnet. Dry Those Fair, Those Chrystal Eyes by Henry King

Dry those fair, those chrystal eyes Which like growing fountains rise To drown their banks. Griefs sullen brooks Would better flow in furrow'd looks. Thy lovely face was never ...

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To A Friend Upon Overbury’s Wife Given To Her by Henry King

To A Friend Upon Overbury’s Wife Given To Her by Henry King

I know no fitter subject for your view Then this, a meditation ripe for you, As you for it. Which when you read you'l see What kind of wife your self will one day bee: Which happy ...

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To His Unconstant Friend by Henry King

To His Unconstant Friend by Henry King

But say thou very woman, why to me This fit of weakness and inconstancie? What forfeit have I made of word or vow, That I am rack't on thy displeasure now? If I have done a fault ...

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The Retreat by Henry King

The Retreat by Henry King

Pursue no more (my thoughts!) that false unkind, You may assoon imprison the North-wind; Or catch the Lightning as it leaps; or reach The leading billow first ran down the breach; ...

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Paradox. That Fruition Destroyes Love by Henry King

Paradox. That Fruition Destroyes Love by Henry King

Love is our Reasons Paradox, which still Against the judgment doth maintain the Will: And governs by such arbitrary laws, It onely makes the Act our Likings cause: We have no ...

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The Farewell by Henry King

The Farewell by Henry King

Splendidis longum valedico nugis. Farewell fond Love, under whose childish whip, I have serv'd out a weary Prentiship; Thou that hast made me thy scorn'd property, To dote on ...

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The Boyes Answer To The Blackmoor by Henry King

The Boyes Answer To The Blackmoor by Henry King

Black Maid, complain not that I fly, When Fate commands Antipathy: Prodigious might that union prove, Where Night and Day together move, And the conjunction of our lips Not kisses ...

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Paradox. That It Is Best For A Young Maid To Marry An Old Man by Henry King

Paradox. That It Is Best For A Young Maid To Marry An Old Man by Henry King

Fair one, why cannot you an old man love? He may as useful, and more constant prove. Experience shews you that maturer years Are a security against those fears Youth will expose ...

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To A. R. Vpon The Same by Henry King

To A. R. Vpon The Same by Henry King

Not that I would instruct or tutor you What is a Wifes behest, or Husbands due, Give I this Widdow-Wife. Your early date Of knowledge makes such Precepts slow and late. This book ...

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The Defence by Henry King

The Defence by Henry King

Piensan los Enamorados Que tienen los otros, los oios quebranta dos. Why slightest thou what I approve? Thou art no Peer to try my love, Nor canst discern where her form lyes, ...

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Tell Me No More How Fair She Is by Henry King

Tell Me No More How Fair She Is by Henry King

TELL me no more how fair she is, I have no minde to hear The story of that distant bliss I never shall come near: By sad experience I have found That her perfection is my wound. ...

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My Midnight Meditation by Henry King

My Midnight Meditation by Henry King

Ill busi'd man! why should'st thou take such care To lengthen out thy life's short calendar? When ev'ry spectacle thou lookst upon Presents and acts thy execution. Each drooping ...

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The Departure. An Elegy. by Henry King

The Departure. An Elegy. by Henry King

VVere I to leave no more then a good friend, Or but to hear the summons to my end, (Which I have long'd for) I could then with ease Attire my grief in words, and so appease That ...

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The Pink by Henry King

The Pink by Henry King

Fair one, you did on me bestow Comparisons too sweet to ow; And but I found them sent from you I durst not think they could be true. But 'tis your uncontrolled power Goddess-like ...

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The Surrender by Henry King

The Surrender by Henry King

MY once dear love, hapless that I no more Must call thee so, the rich affection's store That fed our hope lies now exhaust and spent, Like sums of treasure unto bankrupts lent. ...

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The Short Wooing by Henry King

The Short Wooing by Henry King

Like an Oblation set before a Shrine, Fair One! I offer up this heart of mine. Whether the Saint accept my Gift or no, Ile neither fear nor doubt before I know. For he whose faint ...

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The Change by Henry King

The Change by Henry King

Il sabio mude conseio: Il loco persevera. We lov'd as friends now twenty years and more: Is't time or reason think you to give o're? When though two prentiships set Jacob free, I ...

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The Acquittance by Henry King

The Acquittance by Henry King

Not knowing who should my Acquittance take, I know as little what discharge to make. The favour is so great, that it out-goes All forms of thankfulness I can propose, Those ...

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Psalm I. by Henry King

Psalm I. by Henry King

The man is blest whose feet not tread, By wicked counsailes led: Nor stands in that perverted way, In which the Sinners stray; Nor joynes himselfe unto the chaire, Where Scorners ...

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Upon The Kings Happy Return From Scotland by Henry King

Upon The Kings Happy Return From Scotland by Henry King

So breaks the day when the returning Sun Hath newly through his Winter Tropick run, As You (Great Sir!) in this regress come forth From the remoter Climate of the North. To tell ...

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St. Valentines Day by Henry King

St. Valentines Day by Henry King

Now that each feather'd Chorister doth sing The glad approches of the welcome Spring: Now Phœbus darts forth his more early beam, And dips it later in the curled stream, I should ...

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To The Queen At Oxford by Henry King

To The Queen At Oxford by Henry King

Great Lady! That thus quite against our use, We speak your welcome by an English Muse, And in a vulgar tongue our zeales contrive, Is to confess your large prerogative, Who have ...

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The Legacy by Henry King

The Legacy by Henry King

My dearest Love! when thou and I must part, And th' icy hand of death shall seize that heart Which is all thine; within some spacious will Ile leave no blanks for Legacies to ...

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The Forfeiture by Henry King

The Forfeiture by Henry King

My Dearest, To let you or the world know What Debt of service I do truly ow To your unpattern'd self, were to require A language onely form'd in the desire Of him that writes. It ...

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Sonnet. Vvere Thy Heart Soft As Thou Art Faire by Henry King

Sonnet. Vvere Thy Heart Soft As Thou Art Faire by Henry King

VVere thy heart soft as thou art faire, Thou wer't a wonder past compare: But frozen Love and fierce disdain By their extremes thy graces stain. Cold coyness quenches the still ...

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To My Honoured Friend Mr. George Sandys by Henry King

To My Honoured Friend Mr. George Sandys by Henry King

It is, Sir, a confest intrusion here That I before your labours do appear, Which no loud Herald need, that may proclaim Or seek acceptance, but the Authors fame. Much less that ...

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The Forlorn Hope by Henry King

The Forlorn Hope by Henry King

How long vain Hope do'st thou my joys suspend? Say! must my expectation know no end! Thou wast more kind unto the wandring Greek Who did ten years his Wife and Country seek: Ten ...

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Sonnet. Go Thou That Vainly Do’st Mine Eyes Invite by Henry King

Sonnet. Go Thou That Vainly Do’st Mine Eyes Invite by Henry King

Go thou that vainly do'st mine eyes invite To taste the softer comforts of the night, And bid'st me cool the feaver of my brain, In those sweet balmy dewes which slumber pain; ...

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On Two Children Dying Of One Disease, And Buried In One Grave by Henry King

On Two Children Dying Of One Disease, And Buried In One Grave by Henry King

Brought forth in sorrow, and bred up in care, Two tender Children here entombed are: One Place, one Sire, one Womb their being gave, They had one mortal sickness, and one grave. ...

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To The Same Lady Upon Mr. Burtons Melancholy by Henry King

To The Same Lady Upon Mr. Burtons Melancholy by Henry King

If in this Glass of Humours you do find The Passions or diseases of your mind, Here without pain, you safely may endure, Though not to suffer, yet to read your cure. But if you ...

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